Stanford School of Medicine
Course Catalog

Microbiology and Immunology Course Listing

Required courses for medical students are listed in purple.

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MI 025N. Modern Plagues
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to freshmen. Molecular and medical aspects of new and old microorganisms that infect humans. Goal is to place modern human plagues in scientific and historical perspective. Focus is on factors that lead to emergence and control.
3 units, Spr (J. Boothroyd) Not offered 2009-10.

MI 104/204. Innate Immunology
(Same as Immunology 204) Innate immune mechanisms as the only defenses used by the majority of multicellular organisms. Topics include Toll signaling, NK cells, complement, antimicrobial peptides, phagocytes, neuroimmunity, community responses to infection, and the role of native flora immunity. How microbes induce and defeat innate immune reactions with examples from vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants.
3 units, Spr (D. Schneider)

MI 115B. The Vaccine Revolution
(Same as HUMBIO 155B) Advanced seminar. Human aspects of viral disease, focusing on recent discoveries in the area of vaccine development and emerging infections. Journal club format: students select articles from primary scientific literature, write formal summaries, and synthesize it into a literature review on a specific topic. Emphasis is on analysis, experimental design, and interpretation of data. Oral presentations. Enrollment limited to 10. Prerequisite: HUMBIO/MI 155H, MI 155V
6 units, Win (R. Siegel) Alternate years. Not offered 2009-10.

MI 115C. Human Virology Inquiry Project l
Intensive group tutorial in human virology including classification, clinical features, molecular virology, pathogenesis, immune response, epidemiology, prevention, drug development, and vaccinology. Pertinent examples from all human virus families. Student presentations and discussion in a small group setting. Research and writing intensive. Two quarter sequence. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and written application required for enrollment.
6 units, Aut (R. Siegel)

MI 115D. Human Virology Inquiry Project II
Intensive group tutorial in human virology including classification, clinical features, molecular virology, pathogenesis, immune response, epidemiology, prevention, drug development, and vaccinology. Pertinent examples from all human virus families. Student presentations and discussion in a small group setting. Research and writing intensive. Second quarter of a two quarter sequence. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: MI 115C, consent of instructor and written application required for enrollment.
6 units, Win (R. Siegel)

MI 130/230. Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
For graduate and undergraduate students. Required for first year graduate students in Microbiology and Immunology. Biological properties of microbes associated with diseases of humans; identification and laboratory diagnosis; principles of prevention and treatment; introduction to microbial genetics and evolution as it pertains to pathogenicity. Prerequisite: background in molecular biology.
3 units, Aut (D. Monack) Not offered 2009-10.

MI 155H. Humans and Viruses I
Introduction to human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis is on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Topics: polio and vaccination, smallpox and eradication, yellow fever and history, influenza and genomic diversity, rubella and childhood infections, adenovirus and viral morphology, ebola and emerging infection, lassa fever and immune response.
6 units, Aut (R. Siegel) Not offered 2009-10.

MI 155V. Humans and Viruses II
Introduction to human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Topics: measles and viral epidemiology, rotavirus and world health, rabies and infections of the brain, HPV and cancer -causing viruses, herpes simplex and viral latency, CMV and viral teratogenesis, retrovirology and endogenous viral sequences, HIV and viral treatement, viral hepatitis and chronic infections, prions and diseases of life style. Prerequisite: MI 155H.
6 units, Win (R. Siegel) Not offered 2009-10.

MI 185. Topics in Microbiology
For advanced undergraduates. Topics include diversity, molecular regulation, growth, bioenergetics, and unique matabolic processes. Presentation of student papers on current topic selected with student input. Prerequisites: CHEM 31X, Biology core.
3 units, Win (A. Matin) Not offered 2009-10.

MI 198. Directed Reading in Microbiology and Immunology
Fields of study are decided in consultation with sponsoring professor. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 15 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

MI 199. Undergraduate Research
Investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Possible fields: microbial molecular biology and physiology, microbial pathogenicity, immunology, virology, and molecular parasitology. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

MI 209. Advanced Pathogenesis of Bacteria, Viruses, and Eukaryotic Parasites: Part I
For graduate students and advanced undergraduates; required of first-year graduate students in Microbiology and Immunology. Emphasis is on mechanisms to establish infection in the host and responses of the host to infection. Current literature. Prerequisite: background in biochemistry and molecular biology.
4 units, Win (P. Sarnow) Not offered 2009-10.

MI 210. Advanced Pathogenesis of Bacteria, Viruses, and Eukaryotic Parasites
For graduate and medical students, and advanced undergraduates; required of first-year graduate students in Microbiology and Immunology. The molecular mechanisms by which microorganisms invade animal and human hosts, express their genomes, interact with macromolecular pathways in the infected host, and induce disease. Current literature.
4 units, Win (P. Sarnow)

MI 211. Advanced Immunology I
(Same as IMMUNOL 201). For graduate and medical students and advanced undergraduates. Molecules and cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems; genetics, structure, and function of immune molecules; lymphocyte differentiation and activation; regulation of immune responses; autoimmunity and other problems in immune system dysfunction. Prerequisites: undergraduate course in Immunology and familiarity with experimental approaches in biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology.
3 units, Win (Y. Chien)

MI 215. Principles of Biological Technologies
(Same as IMMUNOL 215) The principles underlying commonly utilized technical procedures in biological research. Lectures and primary literature critiques on gel electrophoresis, protein purification and stabilization, immunofluorescence microscopy, FACS. Prerequisites: biochemistry. Required of first-year graduate students in Microbiology and Immunology, and the Immunology program.
3 units, Spr (K. Kirkegaard)

MI 233. The Biology of Small Modulatory RNAs
(Same As PATH 233, GENE 233) Open to graduate and medical students. How recent discoveries of miRNA, RNA interference, and short interfering RNAs reveal potentially widespread gene regulatory mechanisms mediated by small modulatory RNAs during animal and plant development. Required paper proposing novel research.
2 units, Aut (C. Chen, A. Fire) Not offered 2009-10.

MI 234. Fundamentals of RNA Biology
For graduate or medical students and (if space allows) to active participants from other segments of the Stanford Community (e.g., TGR students); undergraduates by instructor consent. Fundamental issues of RNA biology, with the goal of setting a foundation for students to explore the expanding world of RNA-based regulation. Each week a topic is covered by a faculty lecture and journal club presentations by students.
2 units, Aut (A. Fire, C. Chen, P. Sarnow)

MI 235. Applications of High-Throughput Sequencing
(Same as PATH 235) Student initiated course. Large-scale sequencing of DNA and RNA pools has greatly impacted how we think about the biology of genetic information. This lecture- and discussion-based course focuses on applications of high-throughout and ultra-high-throughout sequencing technologies. Students are introduced to currently available and soon-to-be available sequencing technologies, and to some of the pipelines available for data analysis. Discussions cover a wide repertoire of biological questions, both in basic science and clinical settings, that may be addressed using these technologies. Students are encouraged to think about ways to apply these technologies to advance their own research interests.
2 unit, Win (P. Parameswaran, K. Norman; sponsoring faculty K. Kirkegaard)

MI 240. Professional and Leadership Development
Student led course. Foundational skills; how to communicate, resolve conflict, negotiate, and present. Workshop format integrating theory and practice. Application required; see http://www.stanford.edu/class/immunol240.
2 units, Spr (D. Finan, D. Hite; sponsoring faculty J. Boothroyd)

MI 250. Frontiers in Microbiology & Immunology
Required of first- and second-year students in Microbiology and Immunology. How to evaluate biological research. Held in conjunction with the Microbiology and Immunology Friday noon seminar series. Before the seminar, students and faculty discuss one or more papers from the speaker's primary research literature on a related topic. After the seminar, students meet informally with the speaker to discuss their research.
1 unit, Aut, Win, Spr (D. Schneider)

MI 299. Directed Reading in Microbiology and Immunology
Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

MI 370. Medical Scholars Research
Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
4 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

MI 399. Graduate Research
Students who have completed the necessary foundation courses undertake investigations in general bacteriology, bacterial physiology and ecology, bacterial genetics, microbial pathogenicity, immunology, parasitology, or virology sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1-18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)



 

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