Course Catalog

Medicine Course Listing

Required courses for medical students are listed in purple.

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MED 01A. Leadership in Multicultural Health
Year-long course. Models of instruction for undergraduates serving as Stanford Medical Youth Science Summer Residential Program (SMYSP) staff. Observation, participation, and evaluation of leadership development and multicultural health theories and practices; school and community engagement and advocacy. 1 unit: class attendance and oral presentation; 2 units: class attendance and project portfolio; 3 units: class attendance, poster and oral presentation; 4 units: class attendance and reflective term paper. Applications for this year-long course must be submitted during autumn quarter. Contact Judith Ned: jned@stanford.edu, 650-498-4514. Prerequisite: current or past SMYSP Summer Residential Program staff.
1 to 4 units, Win (M. Winkleby, J. Ned)

MED 01B. Leadership in Multicultural Health
Models of instruction for undergraduates serving as Stanford Medical Youth Science Summer Residential Program (SMYSP) staff. Application of leadership development skills, multicultural health theories and practices, and school and community engagement and advocacy to creating and implementing activities for low-income high school students participating in the Summer Residential Program. 1 unit: class attendance and oral presentation; 2 units: class attendance and project portfolio; 3 units: class attendance, poster and oral presentation; 4 units: class attendance and reflective term paper. Prerequisite: MED 1A.
1 to 4 units, Spr (M. Winkleby, J. Ned)

MED 01C. Leadership in Multicultural Health
Students submit a written reflective term paper based on their experience as staff for the SMYSP Summer Residential Program. Prerequisite: MED 1A/B.
1 unit, Aut (M. Winkleby, J. Ned)

MED 070Q. Cancer and the Immune System
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. Myths and facts surrounding the idea that the immune system is capable of recognizing malignant cells. The biological basis and function of effector arms of the immune system; how these mechanisms may be used to investigate the biological basis and potential therapy of cancer. How the immune system functions. WRITE-2
3 units, Spr (R. Negrin)

MED 083Q. Ethical, Legal, and Social Dimensions of Stem Cell Research
Preference to sophomores. Ethical, legal, social, and economic dimensions of stem cell research such as the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and the international landscape of public policy. How stem cells work, their role in the upkeep of the human body, and current and future uses in medicine. Issues at the intersection of science and society such as human-animal hybrids, notions of justice in intellectual property law, distribution of health care, and the major ethical frameworks defining the debate.
3 units, Spr (C. Scott; sponsoring faculty D. Magnus) Not offered 2009-10)

MED 086Q. Seeing the Heart
Stanford Introductory Seminars: sophomore dialog. Introduction to biomedical technology, science, clinical medicine, and public policy through cardiovascular imaging. Invasive and noninvasive techniques to detect early stage heart disease and to see inside the heart and blood vessels. Topics include: common forms of heart disease, how they develop, and why they affect so many people; imaging technologies such as ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET, and optical; a cost-effective public screening program. Field trips to Stanford Medical Center imaging centers.
1 to 2 units, Win (M. McConnell)

MED 087Q. Women and Aging
(Same as HUMBIO 87Q) Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. Biology, clinical issues, social and health policies of aging; relationships, lifestyles, and sexuality; wise women and grandmothers. Sources include scientific articles, essays, poetry, art, and film. Service-learning experience with older women. GER:EC-Gender
5 units, Win (C. Winograd)

MED 088Q. Dilemmas in Current Medical Practice
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. Social, political, scientific, and economic forces influencing medical practice. Spiraling costs, impaired access to health care, and disillusionment toward the health care system. Attempts by government and medical insurers to control costs through managed care and health maintenance organizations. Medical education and how it has affected the practice of medicine. Alternative health care, preventive medicine, and the doctor-patient relationship. The paradox of health in America: why do so many people who are healthy feel unhealthy? Manadatory observation of instructors in their medical practices.
3 units, Aut (J. Croke, H. Jones)

MED 093Q. The AIDS Epidemic: Biology, Behavior, and Global Responses
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. How the discovery of the causative agent and the modes of transmission of HIV fueled a quest for prevention, treatments, and a vaccine. Discoveries in biology, biotechnology, epidemiology, and medicine during the last 20 years. Hypotheses about the origins of HIV as a human disease; the spread of AIDS and HIV; social, political, and economic consequences of the epidemic; and national and global responses.
3 units, Aut (D. Katzenstein)

MED 094Q. Hormones, Health, and Disease
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. Hormones' roles in maintaining health; how abnormalities in hormones cause disease. Topics include: the pituitary, the master gland; thyroid hormones and metabolism; insulin and diabetes; adrenal steroids and hypertension; vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, calcium, and osteoporosis; sex hormones, birth control, pregnancy, and menopause; androgens, erectile dysfunction, and athletic performance; cholesterol, obesity, and cardiovascular risk. Recommended: background in human biology and physiology.
3 units, Win (D. Feldman) Not offered 2009-10.

MED 108Q. Human Rights and Health
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. History of human-rights law. International conventions and treaties on human rights as background for social and political changes that could improve the health of groups and individuals. Topics such as: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Possible optional opportunities to observe at community sites where human rights and health are issues. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva. PowerPoint presentation on topic of choice required.
3 units, Win (A. Laws)

MED 118Q. Coronary Heart Disease, Pathophysiology, and Treatment
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. Known factors promoting the atherosclerotic process, and the pathologic changes that characterize clinical coronary artery disease. The development of arterial disease and the consequences of coronary occlusion, including heart attack, cardiac rhythm disturbance, and congestive heart failure. Treatment modalities such as cardiac medications, coronary surgery, and angioplasty.
3 units, Spr (S. Stertzer) Not offered 2009-10.

MED 120Q. Pathophysiology and Treatment Aspects of Diseases of the Heart and Blood
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. Anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic states that comprise the discipline of cardiovascular medicine. Anatomy and physiology of the heart and blood vessels as an introduction to pathologic states such as heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, rhythm disturbances of the heart, and sudden cardiac death. Underlying principles of diagnosis and treatment of the disease.
3 units, Spr (S. Stertzer) Not offered 2009-10.

MED 143/243. Patient Health Education in Community Clinics
(Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students) Principles of health education, theories of behavior change, methods for risk reduction. Presentations of health education modules, focusing on topics prevalent among underserved populations. Students apply theoretical frameworks to health education activities in the Cardinal Free Clinics.
2 units, Aut (P. Kao)

MED 147/247. Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research
Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
3 units, Spr (M. Kiernan; sponsoring faculty M. Stefanick)

MED 149/249. Medical Interpreting: Skills and Etiquette
Open to medical students, graduate and undergraduate students. The skills and etiquette of medical interpreting from a cross-cultural perspective. Includes an overview of the U.S. healthcare system and guest lectures on humanistic medicine. Requires two volunteer shifts at the Arbor Free Clinic. Successful completion qualifies students to become volunteer interpreters at the Stanford University Medical Center and the Arbor Free Clinic. Prerequisite: Fluency in a language other than English.
2 units, Win (L. Osterberg, P. Pompei, Y. Chen)

MED 160. Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)
Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
1 unit, Aut, Win,Spr (N. Gesundheit, P. Lewis, R. Williams)

MED 199. Undergraduate Research
Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

MED 201. Introduction to Internal Medicine
Introduction to the different roles internists play in health care. Weekly lectures augmented with opportunities for monitorship, shadowing, and clinical skills-building. Lecture topics include primary care, subspecialties, and non-clinical careers.
1 unit, Aut (A. Verghese, B. Carlton, B. Seligman)

MED 202. Alternative Spring Break: Rural and Native American Health Disparities
Open to MD, graduate, and undergraduate students. Classroom preparation followed by a one week spring break service learning experience on a reservation in South Dakota. Introduces students to the challenges and promise of Native American and rural health care, and the role of communities as leaders and problem solvers. Includes lectures, discussion and readings pertaining to Native American culture, current research in Native American health, and the methods and practice of community based participatory research. Culminates in formulation of a plan for communicating with and engaging community partners in South Dakota: Indian Health Services, Habitat for Humanity, Porcupine Clinic, Teach for America, and Sinte Gleska University.
3 units, Win (K. Subrahmanian, S. Morrison; sponsoring faculty G. Garcia)

MED 207. History of Medicine
Weekly lectures that trace the development of Western medical tradition from Babylonian, Egyptian, and Greek ancient cultures to the present.
1 unit, Win (C. Camargo)

MED 217. Technological Frontiers in Digestive Diseases
Focused on introducing engineering, bioengineering, and physical sciences students to technologies used in the clinical setting. Topics include: endoscopes to detect and remove cancer; minimally invasive surgery to treat obesity; measurements of propulsion through the intestine; and technologies to detect and stop internal bleeding. Observations in the clinical setting; visits to laboratories engaged in the development of new technologies.
2 units, Spr (S. Friedland)

MED 223. Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Sciences Seminar
Weekly modified journal club primarily for faculty, fellows, postdocs, and CVP Scholarly Concentration students. Open to other graduate students. (Advanced undergraduate students with permission of instructor.) Each meeting begins with an overview of a particular area by a faculty member, followed by presentation of a seminal paper in that area by a postdoctoral fellow or a medical student. Discussion follows the presentation, after which the faculty moderator meets separately with the medical students for further questions and discussion.
2 units, Aut, Win, Spr (S. Rockson, J. Cooke, M. Rabinovitch, P. Tsao)

MED 227. Bedside Ultrasound
For pre-clinical or clinical medical students, and others with permission. Uses of ultrasound (US) at the bedside. Portable US machines (now the size of laptop computers) are used. How to identify the normal anatomy of the heart, abdomen, and pelvis using US. As proficiency increases, patients with abnormal physical findings are examined at the bedside, enabling students to compare the traditional physical examination with information obtained during US. The syllabus, Introduction to the Physical Examination with Diagnostic Ultrasound (2001), written by Drs. Wolfe and Thompson is used as the students' guide.
1 unit, Aut, Win, Spr (D. Liang, N. Thompson)

MED 228. Physicians and Social Responsibility
Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
1 unit, Aut (A. Laws)

MED 230. Rethinking International Health
( Same as HRP 240) Issues and players that shape international health today. How to develop a road map for thoughtful, responsible action. Topics include: the role of the physician and health care worker; health as a human right; successful interventions; children's and women's health; issues in immunization; economic development; and NGOs. Online interviews with influential leaders in international health.
2 to 3 units, Spr (J. Goldhaber-Fieber)

MED 236. Psychosocial and Behavioral Health Interventions
For medical students, graduate students and undergraduates with senior standing in Human Biology or Psychology. Contemporary theory and conceptual frameworks for psychosocial and behavioral change interventions as applied in the context of contemporary models of community medicine. The trans-theoretical model of behavioral change, contemporary behavioral, cognitive bahavioral, social cognitive and acceptance-based models of behavioral change. Current models of emotion regulation, goal setting and attainment, and the impact of personality and characterological features on behavior and behavioral change. Application of theory in practicum based community clinic settings. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Stanford HIPAA training.
1 unit, Aut, Win (L. Osterberg, J. Weitlauf) Not offered 2009-10.

MED 240. Sex Differences in Human Physiology and Disease
(Same as HUMBIO 140, OBGYN 240) Required component of the Women's Health Scholarly Concentration. Chromosomal and hormonal influences on cells, tissues, and organs that underlie the development of reproductive organs and sexual dimorphism of the neuroendocrine system. Consequences of sex hormones and environmental factors that differ between men and women in systems including the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, and immunological. Guest lecturers. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
2 to 3 units, Win (M. Stefanick)

MED 241. Context and Practice of Health Care in Free Clinics
Preparation for working in free clinics, awareness of health care context and health disparities among underinsured patients, and introduction to key skills for patient care. Topics include: patient history, screening tests, health insurance, cultural sensitivity, role of interpreters, and tuberculosis testing. Meets at either Arbor or Pacific free clinic to increase familiarity with free clinic operations and environment. Integrates with concurrent Practice of Medicine course.
1 unit, Aut, Win, Sum (L. Osterberg) Not offered 2009-10.

MED 242. Physicians and Human Rights
Weekly lectures on how human rights violations affect health. Topics include: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva.
1 unit, Win (A. Laws)

MED 245. Alternative Medicine
Alternative medicine as a model for critical analysis of unusual, aberrant, and false medical claims. Not an instruction in holistic or alternative medicine. Errors in thinking, reasoning, and practice, as exemplified by alternative claims. Misperception, defects of memory, group consensus, belief, and characteristics of cult behavior. Methods of analysis of unusual medical claims, comparing aberrant reports to scientific standards of evidence. Demonstrations and lectures by advocates followed by analyses and discussions. Recommended preparation: anatomy, physiology, pathology, biochemistry, pharmacology, or reasonable understanding of them.
2 units, Win (W. Sampson; sponsoring faculty W. Creger)

MED 246. The Medical Interview for Spanish Speakers
Student led forum for practicing and learning medical Spanish related specifically to the medical interview. Prepares clinical students to interact more effectively with Spanish speaking patients in clinics. Classes are topical; each class includes a demonstration, medical vocabulary practice, and conversational practice on the topic of the day.
1 unit, Aut, Win (A. Anavitarte, P. Pauerstein; sponsoring faculty Gabriel Garcia); Spr (A. Liu, J. Rosenberg; sponsoring faculty Gabriel Garcia)

MED 248. Student Rounds
Teams of preclinical students meet weekly with a clinical student to hear the history and physical of a recent case the clinical student encountered on the wards. Following the presentation, the preclinical students work together under the guidance of the clinical student to develop a problem list and plan, which are then compared with the problem list, plan, and orders made by the actual admitting team. In the course of presenting the cases, the clinical student describes personal experiences and practical components of ward work and daily clinical routine.
1 unit, any quarter (K. Kenny)

MED 249. Medical Interpreting in Community Clinics
Open to medical students, graduate and undergraduate students. Practical training to serve as a medical interpreter in the Arbor or Pacific Free Clinics, or in other area community health centers. Students must be bilingual.This is not language instruction, but instruction and discussion about the unique role of the medical interpreter in a community-based health care setting, required training in patient privacy, and skill-building. Unit credit also given for service hours in area clinics.
1 to 2 units any quarter (L. Osterberg)

MED 250A. Medical Ethics I
Required for Scholarly Concentration in Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities. The field of bioethics including theoretical approaches to bioethical problems. Contemporary controversies and clinical cases. Issues include: genetics and stem cell research; rationing; ethical issues in care at the end of life; organ transplantation issues. Values that arise in different situations and clinical encounters.
2 units, Win (D. Magnus)

MED 250B. Medical Ethics II
The integration of ethical theory with applications of theory or conceptual issues in medicine, health care, and the life and social sciences. Topic varies by year. Possible topics include: ethical issues in stem cell research; death and dying; genetics and ethics; concepts of health and disease; the ethics of international research; and ethical implications of new reproductive technology.
2 units, Spr (D. Magnus)

MED 255. The Responsible Conduct of Research
Forum. How to identify and approach ethical dilemmas that commonly arise in biomedical research. Issues in the practice of research such as in publication and interpretation of data, and issues raised by academic/industry ties. Contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society regarding research on stem cells, bioweapons, genetic testing, human subjects, and vertebrate animals. Completion fulfills NIH/ADAMHA requirement for instruction in the ethical conduct of research. Prerequisite: research experience recommended.
1 unit, Aut, Win, Spr (K. Karkazis)

MED 255C. The Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical Researchers
Engages clinical researchers in discussions about ethical issues commonly encountered during their clinical research careers and addresses contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society.Graduate students required to take RCR who are or will be conducting clinical research are encouraged to enroll in this version of the course. Prequisite: research experience recommended.
1 unit, Aut (K. Karkazis)

MED 256. Global HIV/AIDS
(Same as HUMBIO 156) Public health, policy, and research issues. Resources at Stanford and institutions such as government, NGOs, and pharmaceutical, advocacy, and international organizations. Sources include biomedical, social, and behavioral sciences. Student projects. Guest lectures. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
3 units, Spr (D. Katzenstein) Not offered 2009-10.

MED 257A. Patient Advocacy in Community Clinics
Early clinical experience for pre-medical and medical students. Structured training and shadowing in preparation for a clinical role working with patients in community health clinics; the context of the work, populations served, and social role of physicians. Regular shifts at one of the course-affiliated clinic sites throughout the academic year. 1-2 units for students attending class meetings and performing clinic shifts. 3-4 units for a year-long, clinic-based project. Applications for this year-long course must be submitted during the previous spring quarter. Contact Ann Banchoff: ann.banchoff@stanford.edu, 650-736-1957.
1 to 4 units, Aut (G. Garcia, A. Banchoff)

MED 257B. Patient Advocacy in Community Clinics
Early clinical experience for pre-medical and medical students. Structured training and shadowing in preparation for a clinical role working with patients in community health clinics; the context of the work, populations served, and social role of physicians. Regular shifts at one of the course-affiliated clinic sites throughout the academic year. 1-2 units for students attending class meetings and performing clinic shifts. 3-4 units for a year-long, clinic-based project. Prerequisite: MED 257A
1 to 4 units, Win (G. Garcia, A. Banchoff)

MED 257C. Patient Advocacy in Community Clinics
Early clinical experience for pre-medical and medical students. Structured training and shadowing in preparation for a clinical role working with patients in community health clinics; the context of the work, populations served, and social role of physicians. Regular shifts at one of the course-affiliated clinic sites throughout the academic year. 1-2 units for students attending class meetings and performing clinic shifts. 3-4 units for a year-long, clinic-based project. Prerequisite: MED 257A,B
1 to 4 units, Spr (G. Garcia, A. Banchoff)

MED 258A. Advanced Patient Advocacy in Community Clinics
Continuation of 257A,B,C for second-year students in Patient Advocacy Program; open to students who have worked in a clinical capacity in a community clinic setting. Skills training in areas such as health education counseling and group facilitation. Regular shifts at partner clinics. Students partner with clinic staff in developing and carrying out a service-learning or research project designed to meet the clinic's needs. Prerequisites: 257A,B,C or consent of instructor.
1 to 3 units, Aut (G.Garcia, A. Banchoff)

MED 258B. Advanced Patient Advocacy in Community Clinics
Continuation of 258A for second-year students in Patient Advocacy Program; open to students who have worked in a clinical capacity in a community clinic setting. Skills training in areas such as health education counseling and group facilitation. Regular shifts at partner clinics. Students partner with clinic staff in developing and carrying out a service-learning or research project designed to meet the clinic's needs. Prerequisites: 257A,B,C and 258A, or consent of instructor.
1 to 3 units, Win (G.Garcia, A. Banchoff)

MED 258C. Advanced Patient Advocacy in Community Clinics
Continuation of 258 A,B for second-year students in Patient Advocacy Program; open to students who have worked in a clinical capacity in a community clinic setting. Skills training in areas such as health education counseling and group facilitation. Regular shifts at partner clinics. Students partner with clinic staff in developing and carrying out a service-learning or research project designed to meet the clinic's needs. Prerequisites: 257A,B,C and 258A,B or consent of instructor.
1 to 3 units, Spr (G.Garcia, A. Banchoff)

MED 259. Oaxacan Health on Both Sides of the Border
Oaxacan and other Mexican migrants; examines the health challenges these groups face. Through discussion and reflection, students prepare for clinical work and community engagement in Oaxaca, while also gaining knowledge and insight to make connections between their experiences in Mexico and their health-related work with Mexican immigrants in the Bay Area. Prerequisite: application and acceptance into the Community Health in Oaxaca Summer Program (http://och.stanford.edu/oaxaca.html).
2 units, Spr (G. Garcia, A. Banchoff)

MED 262. Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries
(Same as ECON 127) Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: background in economics and statistics, and consent of instructor.
5 units, Win (G. Miller) Not offered 2009-10.

MED 263. Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health
(Same as HRP 263) Topics include: Markov and microsimulation models, model calibration and evaluation, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Prerequisites: a course in probability, statistics or biostatistics and a course on cost-effectiveness such as HRP 392.
3 units, Spr (J. Goldhaber-Fieber)

MED 272A. Biodesign Innovation Core : Needs Finding and Concept Creation
(Same as ME 374A, BIOE 374A, OIT 582). Two quarter sequence. Inventing new medical devices and instrumentation, including: methods of validating medical needs; techniques for analyzing intellectual property; basics of regulatory (FDA) and reimbursement planning; brainstorming and early prototyping. Guest lecturers and practical demonstrations. May be taken alone (2 units) or in combination with the project component (4 units).
2 to 4 units, Win (P. Yock, J. Milroy, S. Zenios, T. Brinton)

MED 272B. Biodesign Innovation Core: Concept Development and Implementation
(Same as ME 368B, BIOE 374B, OIT 584) Two quarter sequence. How to take a medical device invention forward from early concept to technology translation and development. Topics include prototyping; patent strategies; advanced planning for reimbursement and FDA approval; choosing translation route (licensing versus start-up); ethical issues including conflict of interest; fundraising approaches and cash requirements; essentials of writing a business or research plan; strategies for assembling a development team. May be taken alone (2 units) or in combination with the project component (4 units). Prerequisite: MED 272A, ME368A, or BIOE 374A.
2 to 4 units, Spr (P. Yock, J. Miilroy, S. Zenios,T. Brinton)

MED 275. Introduction to Biopharmaceutical Innovation
Open to all students. Biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry. Topics include the biopharmaceutical industry, historical trends and experiences; research and development; intellectual property; drug approval: regulatory issues and agencies; business development; marketing; manufacturing; capital structure and financing; careers in biopharmaceutical industry. 2-unit option, lectures and weekly assignments, MED or S/NC grading only. 3-unit option, including a group project and final presentation, may be taken for a letter grade. May be repeated for credit.
2 to 3 units , Win (P. Gardner)

MED 276. Careers in Medical Technology
Career tracks in biomedical technology for medical, life science, engineering, business, and law students of all levels. Industry professionals describe career tracks, current roles, and industry perspectives. 2-unit option, lectures and weekly assignments, MED or S/NC grading only. 3-unit option, including a group project and final presentation, may be taken for a letter grade. May be repeated for credit.
2 to 3 units, Spr (P. Gardner)

MED 280. Early Clinical Experience in Medicine
(Enrollment limited to MD and MSM candidates.) Provides an observational experience as determined by the instructor and student. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 2 units, any quarter. (Search for instructor in Axess)

MED 282. Early Clinical Experience at the Arbor Free Clinic
Students provide health care in a student-run clinic for the homeless and uninsured. Student volunteers are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate. Clinical students and attending physicians provide support and guidance as the team arrives at a diagnosis and management plan. Two units of credit is intended for Steering Committee members or for students who work at the clinic every other Sunday.
1 to 2 units, any quarter (P. Kao, L. Osterberg)

MED 283. Early Clinical Experience at Pacific Free Clinic
Hands-on experience at a student-run free clinic targeting immigrants in the San Jose area. Opportunity to work with an interpreter and learn about unique health care issues faced by immigrants. Students are expected to conduct history and physicals, present to the attending physician, help arrive at a diagnosis and plan and participate in basic procedures. 1 unit for limited commitment. 2 units for volunteers in training and students who volunteer a minimum of once a month. 3 units for Steering Committee members and students who volunteer a minimum of twice a month.
1 to 3 units, any quarter (P. Kao)

MED 289. Introduction to Bioengineering Research
(Same as BIOE 390) Preference to medical and bioengineering graduate students. Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary field that leverages the disciplines of biology, medicine, and engineering to understand living systems, and engineer biological systems and improve engineering designs and human and environmental health. Topics include: imaging; molecular, cell, and tissue engineering; biomechanics; biomedical computation; biochemical engineering; biosensors; and medical devices. Limited enrollment.
1 to 2 units, Aut, Win (C. Taylor)

MED 295. Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS)
(For clinical MD students only) Prepares students to manage the victim of a cardiac arrest. Knowledge and skills necessary for resuscitation of critically-ill patients. Clinical scenarios and small group discussions address cardiovascular pharmacology, arrhythmia recognition and therapy, acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction, ventricular dysrhythmias and defibrillation, and acute ischemic stroke. Requires pre-course preparation and an intensive two-day session on a Friday and Saturday. Students should get the approval of their Clerkship Coordinator before registering for the course. Recommended prerequisites: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A.
2 units, Aut, Win, Spr (J. Giacomini)

MED 299. Directed Reading in Medicine
Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

MED 370. Medical Scholars Research
Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
4 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

MED 399. Graduate Research
Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)



 

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