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Course Catalog - Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford School of Medicine
Course Catalog

Course Listing

Required courses for medical students are listed in purple.

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PATH 101. Cancer Biology
(Same as CBIO 101) Experimental approaches to understanding the origins, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Focus on key experiments and discoveries with emphasis on genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Topics include carcinogens, tumor virology, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle regulation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, cancer genomics, cancer epidemiology, and cancer therapies. Discussion sections based on primary research articles that describe key experiments in the field. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
4 units, Win (J. Lipsick)

PATH 103Q. Lymphocyte Migration
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. How lymphocytes leave the blood stream and enter tissues to participate in immune surveillance and the development of inflammation. Known as lymphocyte migration, this process involves a complex series of adhesion, activation and diapedesis events. The cellular mechanisms involved in lymphocyte migration, including lymphocyte adhesion molecules that interact with their counter-receptors on endothelial cells, and molecules, including cytokines and chemokines, that attract or activate lymphocytes. The roles of these molecules in the development of human diseases such as asthma, type 1 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis.
1 unit, Aut (S. Michie)

PATH 105Q. Final Analysis: The Autopsy as a Tool of Medical Inquiry
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. Based on review of patient medical histories and examination of formalin-fixed and unfixed tissues from autopsy. Student-directed problem-solving; students develop learning objectives for each case, and present findings. The effect of disease on normal structure and function, ethics of patient care, allocation of medical resources, efficiency of therapy, and medical error. Prerequisite: hepatitis-B vaccination; free vaccinations during the winter for accepted students.
3 units, Spr (A. Connolly)

PATH 199. Undergraduate Research
Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

PATH 206. Epigenetics
(Same as GENE 206, BIO 156/256) For graduate students in the Biosciences and upper level Biology undergraduates. Mechanisms by which phenotypes not determined by the DNA sequence are stably inherited in successive cell divisions. From the discovery of position-effect variegation in Drosophila in the 1920s to present-day studies of covalent modifications of histones and DNA methylation. Topics include: position effect, gene silencing, heterochromatin, centromere identity, genomic imprinting, histone code, variant histones, and the role of epigenetics in cancer. Prerequisite: BIO41 and BIO42 , or GENE 203, or consent of instructor.
2 units, Spr (J. Lipsick, O. Gozani) Alternate years. Not offered 2010-11.

PATH 210. Stem Cells in Development and Disease
Molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the basic self-renewal and differentiation properties of stem cells in multiple tissues and organisms. How abnormal stem cell behaivior may contribute to diseases such as cancer. How to manipulate stem cell behavior in vitro or in vivo for therapeutic purposes. Classical papers and recent literatures in the field of stem cell biology. Open to graduate, medical, and advanced undergraduate students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 2 units, Aut (B. Lu)

PATH 213. Gross Autopsy Pathology Laboratory
Examine/discuss unfixed dissected organs from current autopsies and correlate morphologic findings with the clinical history. Students view postmortem examinations and may participate (in a small group) in one postmortem examination with the assistance of residents and staff, and present the case to the class. Class scheduling is flexible. Additional unit for participation in a postmortem examination. Pre- or corequisite: HHD
2 to 3 units, Aut, Win (D. Regula)

PATH 218. Computational Analysis of Biological Images
Physical and computational tools for acquisition, processing, interpretation, and archiving of biological images. Emphasis is on digital microscopy.
2 units, Spr (A. Fire) Alternate years. Not offered 2009-10.

PATH 233. The Biology of Small Modulatory RNAs
(Same as MI 233, GENE 233) Open to graduate and medical students. How recent discoveries of miRNA, RNA interference, and short interfering RNAs reveal potentially widespread gene regulatory mechanisms mediated by small modulatory RNAs during animal and plant development. Required paper proposing novel research.
2 units, Aut (C. Chen, A. Fire) Not offered 2009-10.

PATH 234. Fundamentals of RNA Biology
For graduate or medical students and (if space allows) to active participants from other segments of the Stanford Community (e.g., TGR students); undergraduates by instructor consent. Fundamental issues of RNA biology, with the goal of setting a foundation for students to explore the expanding world of RNA-based regulation. Each week a topic is covered by a faculty lecture and journal club presentations by students.
2 units, Aut (A. Fire, C. Chen, P. Sarnow)

PATH 235. Applications of High-Throughput Sequencing
(Same as MI 235) Student initiated course. Large-scale sequencing of DNA and RNA pools has greatly impacted how we think about the biology of genetic information. This lecture- and discussion-based course focuses on applications of high-throughout and ultra-high-throughout sequencing technologies. Students are introduced to currently available and soon-to-be available sequencing technologies, and to some of the pipelines available for data analysis. Discussions cover a wide repertoire of biological questions, both in basic science and clinical settings, that may be addressed using these technologies. Students are encouraged to think about ways to apply these technologies to advance their own research interests.
2 unit, Win (P. Parameswaran, K. Norman; sponsoring faculty A. Fire)

PATH 240. Clinical Studies in Pathology I
Broad exposure to the practice of pathology in an academic medical center. Students are assigned a faculty mentor and work closely with pathology residents, fellows and faculty. Students spend two months in surgical pathology and one month in autopsy pathology. On the surgical pathology service students help examine surgical resection specimens and biopsies, and learn how to construct a pathology report. On the autopsy pathology service, students assist with prosection and learn to formulate a final anatomic diagnosis. May be combined with Clinical Studies in Pathology II, and two additional quarters of PATH399, Directed Research, to fulfill a 12 month Post-Sophomore year Fellowship in Pathology. Prerequisite: instructor consent.
3 to 9 units, any quarter (Natkunam, Higgins)

PATH 241. Clinical Studies in Pathology II
In-depth exposure to the practice of pathology for students who have completed "Clinical Studies in Pathology I." Students are assigned a faculty mentor and work closely with pathology residents, fellows and faculty. Two months are spent in surgical pathology where students help examine surgical resection specimens and biopsies and participate in making a final diagnosis. One month is spent in autopsy pathology where students perform autopsy prosections and formulate final anatomic diagnoses under the supervision of faculty. Additional time may be spent observing in sub-specialty areas of pathology that include dermatopatholgy, neuropathology, renal pathology, lymph node pathology or cytology. may be combined with "Clinical Studies in Pathology I" and two additional quarters of PATH 399, Directed Research, to fulfill a 12-month Post-Sophomore year Fellowship in Pathology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and successful completion of Clinical Studies in Pathology I (PATH 240).
3 to 9 units, any quarter (Natkunam, Higgins)

PATH 280. Early Clinical Experience in Pathology
(Enrollment limited to MD and MSM candidates.) Provides an observational experience as determined by the instructor and student. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 2 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

PATH 296. Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine
(Same as DBIO 296) For graduate and medical students. Embryonic and adult stem cells, including origin, regulation, self-renewal, differentiation, fate, and relationship to cancer; biological mechanisms and methods to translate findings to therapeutic applications. Medical students must enroll for 5 units; graduate students may choose to take only the basic science part for 3 units. Prerequisites: DBIO 201 and 210, or consent of instructor.
3 to 5 units, Win (I. Weissman, R. Nusse, M. Fuller, )

PATH 299. Directed Reading in Pathology
Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

PATH 370. Medical Scholars Research
Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
4 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

PATH 399. Graduate Research
Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Opportunities are available at the molecular, cellular, and clinicopathologic levels. The department is fully equipped for all modern research and maintains an active and vigorous postdoctoral research training program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)



 

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