Course Catalog

Surgery Course Listing

Required courses for medical students are listed in purple.

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SURG 067Q. Health and Medicine in an International World
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. Topics may include the history and international development of Interplast, a nonprofit organization providing free reconstructive surgery for needy children and adults in developing nations; health care at King Faisal Hospital, Saudi Arabia; medical conditions in S. India; eye care in Africa; medical teaching experiences in Dar es Salaam and Haiti; and rural health care in Latin America. The role such activities play in U.S. international relationships.
3 units, Win (N.E. Wang) Not offered 2009-10.

SURG 068Q. Current Concepts in Transplantation
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. Biological aspects of cell and organ transplantation, including issues that arise in the media. Diseases for which transplantation is a treatment, the state of the art in human transplantation, transplantation of animal tissue into humans (xenotransplantation), development of new tissue and organs in the laboratory (tissue engineering and cloning), and development of drugs and biological strategies to promote long-term survival of the tissue or organ (tolerance). How to write a scientific abstract, critique scientific literature, and research and present topics in contemporary transplantation. WRITE-2
3 units, Spr (O. Martinez, S. Krams)

SURG 069Q. It's All in the Head: Understanding Diversity, Development, and Deformities of the Face
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. How the face conveys moods and emotions, and elicits reactions when disease or genetic disorders leave behind disfigurement. New work by evolutionary and molecular biologists concerning how variations in facial form are elicited; how tissues and molecules interact to form the face. How differences in facial anatomy affect an individual's self-perception and their acceptance in our beauty-conscious society.
3 to 4 units, Win (J. Helms, B. Liu)

SURG 070Q. Surgical Anatomy of the Hand: From Rodin to Reconstruction
Stanford Introductory Dialog. Preference to sophomores. The surgical anatomy of the hand is extremely complex in terms of structure and function. Exploration of the anatomy of the hand in different contexts: its representation in art forms, the historical development of the study of hand anatomy, current operative techniques for reconstruction, advances in tissue engineering, and the future of hand transplantation.
2 units, Win (J. Chang)

SURG 101. Regional Study of Human Structure
Preference to seniors. Lectures in regional anatomy and dissection of the human cadaver; the anatomy of the trunk and limbs through the dissection process, excluding the head and neck.
5 units, Win (J. Gosling, I. Whitmore)

SURG 102/202. Principles and Practice of International Medical Humanitarianism
Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. Focus is on understanding the ethics of international surgical aid, the role of surgery in international health, humanitarian theory, the role of students in the international health setting, and business and medicine in the social sector. Opportunities for international health service. Guest speakers include world-renowned physicians, CEOs, and public health workers.
4 units, Win (S. P. Samagh, S. K. Samagh. D. Laub; sponsoring faculty J. Chang )

SURG 111A/211A. Emergency Medical Technician (EMT-1): Training and Application
(Graduate students register for 211A.) Basics of life support outside the hospital setting; readiness training for emergencies on- or off-campus. Topics include emergency patient assessments, and cardiac, respiratory, and neurological emergencies. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Prerequisiites: CPR certification; application (see http://surg211.stanford.edu), and consent of instructor.
3 units, Aut (G. Gilbert, P. D'Souza)

SURG 111B/211B. Emergency Medical Technician (EMT-1): Training and Application
(Graduate students register for 211B.) Continuation of 111A/211A. Approach to traumatic injuries. Topics include head, neck, and trunk injuries, bleeding and shock, burn emergencies, and environmental emergencies. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Prerequisite: 111A/211A and consent of instructor.
3 units, Win (G. Gilbert, P. D'Souza)

SURG 111C/211C. Emergency Medical Technician (EMT-1): Training and Application
(Graduate students register for 211C.) Continuation of 111B/211B. Topics include pediatric, obstetric, and gynecologic emergencies, EMS operations, mass casualty incidents, and assault. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Prerequisite: 111B/211B and consent of instructor.
3 units, Spr (G. Gilbert, P. D'Souza)

SURG 112A/212A. Advanced Reading and Teaching for the EMT-1
Advanced Topics in EMS and training in Teaching BLS skills (Graduate students register for 212A.) Topics include advanced airway and stroke management, abdominal emergencies, and prehospital pharmacology. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT-Basic certification) CPR for the Professional Rescuer certification, and consent of instructor.
2 to 3 units, Aut (G. Gilbert, P. D'Souza)

SURG 112B/212B. Advanced Reading and Teaching for the EMT-1
Advanced Topics in EMS and training in teaching BLS skills. (Graduate students register for 212B.) Topics include advanced assessment and treatment of the undifferentiated trauma patient (including advanced airway management, monitoring, and evaluation) and prehospital care in nontraditional locations. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT-Basic certification) CPR for the Professional Rescuer certification, and consent of instructor.
2 to 3 units, Win (G. Gilbert, P. D'Souza)

SURG 112C/212C. Advanced Reading and Teaching for the EMT-1
Advanced Topics in EMS and training in teaching BLS skills. (Graduate students register for 212C.) Topics include advanced assessment and treatment of patients in difficult and advanced situations - mass casualty incidents, assaults, pediatrics; and advanced emergency skills - ultrasound, suturing. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT-Basic certification) CPR for the Professional Rescuer certification, and consent of instructor.
2 to 3 units, Spr (G. Gilbert, P. D'Souza)

SURG 201. Basic Cardiac Life Support
(Enrollment limited to medical students.) All medical students must be certified in Basic Cardiac Life Support before the end of the first (autumn) quarter. Students who provide documentation of certification received within six months prior to the date of matriculation will be exempted from the requirement. The course teaches one- and two-rescuer CPR, management of an obstructed airway, and CPR for infants and children. Upon completion of the course, students receive an American Heart Association certificate in BLS.
1 unit, Aut (R. Smith-Coggins)

SURG 203A. Human Anatomy
Introduction to human structure and function presented from a medical perspective. Introduction to the physical examination and frequently-used medical imaging techniques. Students are required to attend lectures, actively participate in seminar groups, and engage in dissection of the human body in the anatomy laboratory. Surgery 203A presents structure of the thorax, abdomen, pelvis and limbs.
11 units, Aut (Gosling J., Whitmore, I.)

SURG 203B. Human Anatomy
Continues the introduction to human structure and function from a medical perspective, the physical examination, and frequently-used medical imaging techniques. Students are required to attend lectures, actively participate in seminar groups, and engage in dissection of the human body in the anatomy laboratory. Surgery 203B presents structure of the head, neck and back.
4 units, Win (J. Gosling, I. Whitmore)

SURG 204. Introduction to Surgery and Surgical Techniques
Innovative introduction to the various aspects of surgery directed at pre-clinical students. Students participate in interactive clinical surgical scenarios animated by attending physicians. Covers the spectrum of surgical specialties. Includes scrubbing techniques, basic instrument handling, and the opportunity to scrub in on operations at Stanford Hospital.
1 unit, Aut (R. Greco, J. Chang)

SURG 205. Advanced Suturing Techniques
Student initiated course. Builds upon skills taught in the Surgical Interest Group's introductory suturing workshops. Techniques such as suturing in a hole, suturing different tissues, and hand, instrument and laparoscopic knot tying.
1 unit, Aut (M. Wehner; sponsoring faculty B. Visser)

SURG 208. Plastic Surgery Tutorial
Diagnosis, theory, and practice of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Limited to two students per faculty member.
2 units, any quarter (J. Chang, V. Hentz, H.P. Lorenz, S. Schendel, P. Johannet, D. Kahn)

SURG 209. Plastic Surgery
Students participate in plastic and reconstructive surgery as functioning members of the clinical team. Students are exposed to operative surgery, emergency and trauma care, evaluation of operative candidates in the outpatient setting, and also attend teaching conferences. Limited to four students. Prerequisite: completion of first year or clinical experience.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (J. Chang, V. Hentz, H.P. Lorenz, S. Schendel, P. Johannet, D. Kahn)

SURG 220. Emergency Medicine: Introduction
The specialty of emergency medicine and initial care of emergency patients, both in the pre-hospital phase and in the emergency department. Lectures and/or practical sessions cover: patient assessment; the initial management of the multiple trauma patient; and common medical emergencies, such as poisoning, asthma, and chest pain. Students taking the course for 1 unit must have 50% class attendance and pass the final exam; 2 units constitutes 70% class attendance and passing the final exam; 3 units includes participation in emergency department observation shifts; 4 units requires 90% attendance and includes both observation and EMS ride-alongs.
1 to 4 units, Aut (S. Mahadevan)

SURG 223. Basic Emergency Care: Travel, and Wilderness Medicine
Open to all students. Wilderness-related illnesses and injuries; a framework for evaluation and treatment of emergencies in the backcountry. Hands-on clinical skills. Topics include high altitude medicine, hypothermia, envenomations, search and rescue, improvisation, and survival medicine. Includes opportunity for certification in Wilderness First Aid (WFA).
4 units, Spr (G. Lipman)

SURG 225. Transplantation Science
Offers medical students a more in-depth understanding of the field of transplantation. Develops an understanding of transplant immunology, tissue typing, immunopharmacology, and transplant pathology. Includes such topics as heart and heart/lung transplantation, kidney/pancreas transplantation, liver transplantation, bone marrow transplantation, and donor issues. Focus is on the field of transplantation as it relates to preoperative care and management of patients prior to transplantation as well as the long term care and follow-up of patients. Guest speakers. Prerequisites: SURG 218 (Anatomy); BIOC 200 (may be taken concurrently).
1 unit, Win (C. Esquivel) Alternate years. Not offered 2009-10.

SURG 228. Introduction to Vascular Disease and Treatment
Develops basic interventional skills using endovascular simulation in multiple vascular beds. Topics: peripheral vascular disease and angiography and SFA intervention labs; aortoiliac disease and ILIAC intervention lab; visceral vascular disease and renal intervention lab; cerebrovascular disease and carotid intervention lab; frontiers in vascular disease. Prerequisite: completion of first year of medical school.
1 unit, Aut, Win (J. Lee, D. Peterson)

SURG 229. Advanced Vascular Disease and Treatment
Designed for students interested in careers in vascular surgery and vascular medicine. Expands upon the basic physiology, pathology, and skills learned in SURG 228. Topics: renal disease, cerebrovascular disease and carotid interventions, AAA disease and intervention, DVT disease, the future of vascular surgery. Centered on simulation based learning, student presentations, and discussion. Prerequisite: SURG 228
1 unit, Spr (J. Lee)

SURG 230. Obesity in America
Prevalence and effects of the obesity epidemic in America and the growing prevalence of associated comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, sleep apnea, and joint problems. Risk factors, multi-disciplinary treatment options, the role of food in society, patients' perspectives, and current research in the field. Includes fieldtrips to grocery stores and restaurants.
1 unit, Win (J. Morton, G. Woodard)

SURG 231. Healthcare in Developing Countries: Haiti and Beyond
Lunchtime lecture series open to all students. Aims to answer the deceptively simple question: How can we improve health in the devoping world? Topics range from water sanitation to supply-side incentivization, from family planning to war zone surgery. Students gain useful skills for experience in international medicine. MD students are eligible to apply for a sub-internship in surgery at Hopital Albert Schweitzer in Dechapelle, Haiti.
1 unit, Spr (R. Greco, E. Leroux)

SURG 254. Operative Anatomy and Techniques
For preclinical students; provides a background in and integrates knowledge of surgical anatomy and therapy. Surgical or operative anatomy differs from gross anatomy in that the area exposed during surgery may be limited, the dissection may require exposing other seemingly unrelated anatomic structures with unique landmarks, and the procedure may require unusual technical facility. The course provides an opportunity for students to understand the goals of representative surgical procedures (translating pathophysiology to surgical decision making to actual incision). Students learn surgical skills and perform the dissection of a number of commonly performed operations in the cadaver laboratory. The course emphasizes hands-on participation in surgical procedures in the laboratory and is taught by attending physicians in general, cardiothoracic, vascular, plastic, head and neck, urologic, and Orthopaedic surgery.
1 unit, Win (J. Fann, P. Johannet)

SURG 280. Early Clinical Experience in Surgery
(Enrollment limited to MD candidates.) Provides an observational experience in a surgery specialty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 2 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

SURG 296. Individual Work-Human Anatomy
Carried out under the supervision of one or more members of the staff. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (I. Whitmore, J. Gosling)

SURG 299. Directed Reading in Surgery
Consists of studies in progress including cardiovascular and circulatory problems; gastric physiology; hemostatic disorders; homotransplantation; liver disorders; Orthopaedic pathology; bone growth; radiation injury; immunology, bacteriology, pathology, and physiology of the eye; physiological optics; comparative ophthalmology; neurophysiology of hearing; spatial orientation and disorientation; nasal function; and psychophysics of sensation. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

SURG 370. Medical Scholars Research
Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
4 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

SURG 399. Graduate Research
Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)



 

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