Stanford School of Medicine
Course Catalog

Health Research and Policy Course Listing

Required courses for medical students are listed in purple.

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HRP 089Q. Introduction to Crosscultural Issues in Medicine
Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to sophomores. Introduction to social factors that impact health care delivery, such as ethnicity, immigration, language barriers, and patient service expectations. Focus is on developing a framework to understand culturally unique and non-English speaking populations in the health care system. GER:EC-AmerCul
3 units, Win (I. Corso)

HRP 199. Undergraduate Research
Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

HRP 206. Research Methods for Meta-Analysis
(Same as STATS 211) Meta-analysis as a quantitative method for combining the results of independent studies enabling researchers to evaluate available evidence. Examples of meta-analysis in medicine, education, and social and behavioral sciences. Statistical methods include nonparametric methods, contingency tables, regression and analysis of variance, and Bayesian methods. Project involving an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: basic sequence in statistics.
3 units, Win (I. Olkin)

HRP 207. Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research I
Primarily for medical students in the Health Services and Policy Research scholarly concentration. Topics include health economics, statistics, decision analysis, study design, quality measurement, cost benefit and effectiveness analysis, and evidence based guidelines.
2 units, Aut (C. Haberland)

HRP 208. Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research II
Primarily for medical students in the Health Services and Policy Research scholarly concentration; continuation of 207. Topics include health economics, statistics, decision analysis, study design, quality measurement, cost benefit and effectiveness analysis, and evidence based guidelines. Recommended: 207.
2 units, Win (C. Haberland)

HRP 209. FDA's Regulation of Health Care
(Same as Law 458) Open to law or medical students; graduate students by consent of instructor. The FDA's regulatory authority over drugs, biologics, medical devices, and dietary supplements. The nature of the pharmaceutical, biotech, medical device, and nutritional supplement industries.
2.5 units, Aut (H. Greely) Not offered 2009-10.

HRP 210. Health Law and Policy
(Same as Law 313) Open to law , medicine, business, and graduate students. Focus this term is on the physician/patient relationship, medical ethics, and public health law.
3 units, Aut (Greely)

HRP 211. Law and the Biosciences
(Same as LAW 368) Open to law and medical students; other graduate students by consent of instructor. Legal, social, and ethical issues arising from advances in neuroscience, including effects upon law and society through improvements in predicting illnesses and behaviors, reading minds through neuroimaging, understanding responsibility and consciousness, treating criminal behavior, and cognitive enhancement. May be repeated for credit. (Semester schedule.)
3 units, Win (H. Greeley) Not offered 2009-10.

HRP 212. Crosscultural Medicine
Interviewing and behavioral skills needed to facilitate culturally relevant health care across all population groups. Explicit and implicit cultural influences operating in formal and informal medical contexts.
3 units, Spr (I. Corso)

HRP 213. Research Protocol Development for Clinical and Translational Research
Primarily for medical students in the Clinical Research Scholarly concentration; open to graduate students except Epidemiology graduate students. Development of research questions and plans for statistical analysis. Study design, sample size and power calculations, and statistical analysis of study data. Analytic methods to carry out statistical power and sample size calculations. Prerequisites: 225, and 258 or 259, or consent of instructor.
2 to 3 units, Spr (R. Popat) Not offered 2009-10.

HRP 214. Scientific Writing
Step-by-step through the process of writing and publishing a scientific manuscript. How to write effectively, concisely, and clearly. Preparation of an actual scientific manuscript. Students are encouraged to bring a manuscript on which they are currently working to develop and polish throughout the course.
2 to 3 units, Win (K. Sainani)

HRP 215. Scientific Writing for Basic and Translational Scientists
Teaches students in the basic sciences how to write clearly, concisely, and effectively. Focuses on the process of writing and publishing a scientific manuscript. Not intended for epidemiology graduate students.
2 to 3 units, Sum (K. Sainani)

HRP 216. Analytical and Practical Issues in the Conduct of Clinical and Epidemiologic Research
Topics include: advanced aspects of study design and data analyses; development of health measurement instruments; methods of summarizing literature and quantifying effect sizes; and multivariable nature of health events in human populations. 3 units requires a term paper. Prerequisites: 225, and 258 or 261, or consent of instructor.
2 to 3 units, Spr (R. Popat)

HRP 220. BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW AND POLICY
(Same as LAW 440) Open to all law or medical students; other graduate students by consent of the instructor. Focuses on the biotechnology industry, with some discussion of the "med tech" or medical device industry and the pharmaceutical industry. The life cycle of a biotech firm, from a good idea to a start-up company to FDA approval and beyond. Guest speakers. In addition to a final exam, students are required to participate in a group project during the term, making law and business recommendations about a biotech firm.
3 units, Spr (H. Greely)

HRP 221. Law and the Biosciences: Genetics
(Same as LAW 480) Open to all law or medical students; other graduate students by consent of the instructor. Ethical, legal, and social issues arising primarily from advances in knowledge of human genetics. May also include a section on stem cell research.
3 units, Spr (H. Greely)

HRP 223. Epidemiologic Analysis: Data Management and Statistical Programming
The skills required for management and analysis of biomedical data. Topics include importing and exporting data from multiple database systems, visualizing and cleaning data, data management for multicenter projects, and data security. Introduction to applied statistical programming relevant to epidemiologic and clinical research. No previous programming experience required.
2 to 3 units, Aut (R. Balise)

HRP 225. Design and Conduct of Clinical and Epidemiologic Studies
Intermediate-level. The skills to design, carry out, and interpret epidemiologic studies, particularly of chronic diseases. Topics: epidemiologic concepts, sources of data, cohort studies, case-control studies, cross-sectional studies, sampling, estimating sample size, questionnaire design, and the effects of measurement error. Prerequisite: A basic/introductory course in statistics or consent of instructor.
3 to 4 units, Aut (R. Popat)

HRP 226. Advanced Epidemiologic and Clinical Research Methods
The principles of measurement, measures of effect, confounding, effect modification, and strategies for minimizing bias in epidemiologic studies. Prerequisite: 225 or consent of instructor.
3 to 4 units, Win (L. Nelson)

HRP 228. Genetic Epidemiology
Reading of seminal papers in genetic epidemiology. Topics include human genetic variation, genetics of complex diseases, genome-wide association studies, and new genomic technologies. Provides a background for clinicians, epidemiologists, and other scientists to incorporate the study of genetic factors into human disease research. Prerequisite: HRP 225 or consent of instructor.
2 units, Spr (W. Sieh)

HRP 229. Methods in Chronic Disease Epidemiology
Descriptive epidemiology and sources of incidence and mortality data; biological bases of neurological, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and other chronic diseases except cancer; methodological and analytic issues relevant to chronic epidemiologic research; causal inference; major environmental risk factors; genetic susceptibility; and examples of current research and critiques of literature. Prerequisite: 225 or consent of instructor.
2 to 3 units, Spr (R. Popat) Alternate years. Not offered 2009-10.

HRP 230. Cancer Epidemiology
Descriptive epidemiology and sources of incidence/mortality data; the biological basis of carcinogenesis and its implications for epidemiologic research; methodological issues relevant to cancer research; causal inference; major environmental risk factors; genetic susceptibility; cancer control; examples of current research; and critique of the literature. 3 units requires paper or project. Prerequisite: 225, or consent of instructor.
2 to 3 units, Win (D. West) Alternate years. Not offered 2010-11.

HRP 231. Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
Principles of the transmission of the infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, rickettsiae, mycoplasma, fungi, and protozoan and helminth parasites). The role of vectors, reservoirs, and environmental factors. Pathogen and host characteristics that determine the spectrum of infection and disease. Endemicity, outbreaks, and epidemics of selected infectious diseases. Principles of control and surveillance.
3 units, Win (J. Parsonnet, Y. Maldonado) Not offered 2009-10.

HRP 234. Foundations of Pharmacoepidemiology
Historical development of pharmacoepidemiology, the drug development process and pharmacoepidemiology's role in it, pharmacovigilance/drug safety systems, epidemiology in outcomes research, the role of pharmacoepidemiology in risk management, and classic examples of pharmacoepidemiologic investigations.
2 to 3 units, Spr (V. Henderson, D. Lilienfeld) Alternate years. Not offered 2010-11.

HRP 236. Epidemiology Research Seminar
Weekly forum for ongoing epidemiologic research by faculty, staff, guests, and students, emphasizing research issues relevant to disease causation, prevention, and treatment. May be repeated for credit.
1 unit, Aut, Win, Spr (V. Henderson, W. Sieh, A. Whittemore)

HRP 238. Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health
(Same as HUMBIO 159) The historical, contemporary, and future research and practice among genetics, epidemiology, clinical medicine, and public health as a source of insight for medicine and public health. Genetic and environmental contributions to multifactorial diseases; multidisciplinary approach to enhancing detection and diagnosis. The impact of the Human Genome Project on analysis of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and cancer. Ethical and social issues in the use of genetic information. Prerequisite: basic course in genetics.
2 t0 3 units, Win (R. Popat)

HRP 239. Understanding Statistical Models and their Social Science Applications
(Same as EDUC 260X) Information that statistical modeling can provide in experimental and non-experimental settings emphasizing misconceptions in social science applications such as causal modeling. Text is Statistical Models: Theory and Practice, by David Freedman. See http://www-stat.stanford.edu/~rag/stat209. Prerequisite: intermediate-level statistical methods including multiple regression, logistic regression, and log-linear models.
3 units, Win (D. Rogosa)

HRP 240.
( Same as MED 230) Issues and players that shape international health today. How to develop a road map for thoughtful, responsible action. Topics include: the role of the physician and health care worker; health as a human right; successful interventions; children's and women's health; issues in immunization; economic development; and NGOs. Online interviews with influential leaders in international health.
2 to 3 units, Spr (J. Goldhaber-Fiebert)

HRP 251. Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials
The rationale for phases 1-3 clinical trials, the recruitment of subjects, techniques for randomization, data collection and endpoints, interim monitoring, and reporting of results. Emphasis is on the theoretical underpinnings of clinical research and the practical aspects of conducting clinical trials.
3 units, Spr (V. Henderson, P. Lavori)

HRP 252. Outcomes Analysis
(Same as BIOMEDIN 251) Methods of conducting empirical studies which use large existing medical, survey, and other databases to ask both clinical and policy questions. Econometric and statistical models used to conduct medical outcomes research. How research is conducted on medical and health economics questions when a randomized trial is impossible. Problem sets emphasize hands-on data analysis and application of methods, including re-analyses of well-known studies. Prerequisites: one or more courses in probability, and statistics or biostatistics.
3 units, Spr (J. Bhattacharya)

HRP 256. Economics of Health and Medical Care
(Same as ECON 126, BIOMEDIN 126/256, HUMBIO 121A) Graduate students with research interests should take ECON 248. Graduate students with research interests should take ECON 248. Institutional, theoretical, and empirical analysis of the problems of health and medical care. Topics: institutions in the health sector; measurement and valuation of health; nonmedical determinants of health; medical technology and technology assessment; demand for medical care and medical insurance; physicians, hospitals, and managed care; international comparisons. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102A or equivalent statistics. Recommended: ECON 51.
5 units, Aut (J. Bhattacharya)

HRP 258. Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Clinical Research
Open to medical and graduate students; required of medical students in the Clinical Research Scholarly Concentration. Tools to evaluate medical literature. Topics include random variables, expectation, variance, probability distributions, the central limit theorem, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and survival analysis.
3 units, Spr (K. Sainani)

HRP 259. Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Epidemiology
Topics: random variables, expectation, variance, probability distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals. Correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and nonparametric tests. Introduction to least squares and maximum likelihood estimation. Emphasis is on medical applications.
4 to 5 units, Aut ( R. Balise)

HRP 260A,B,C. Workshop in Biostatistics
(Same as STATS 260A,B,C) Applications of statistical techniques to current problems in medical science. Enrollment for more than 2 units of credit involves extra reading or consulting and requires consent of instructor.
1 to 2 units, A: Aut, B: Win, C: Spr (R. Olshen)

HRP 261. Intermediate Biostatistics: Analysis of Discrete Data
(same as BIOMEDIN 233, STATS 261). Methods for analyzing data from case-control and cross-sectional studies: the 2x2 table, chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, odds ratios, Mantel-Haenzel methods, stratification, tests for matched data, logistic regression, conditional logistic regression. Emphasis is on data analysis in SAS. Special topics: cross-fold validation and bootstrap inference.
3 units, Win (K. Sainani)

HRP 262. Intermediate Biostatistics: Regression, Prediction, Survival Analysis
(Same as STATS 262). Methods for analyzing longitudinal data. Topics include Kaplan-Meier methods, Cox regression, hazard ratios, time-dependent variables, longitudinal data structures, profile plots, missing data, modeling change, MANOVA, repeated-measures ANOVA, GEE, and mixed models. Emphasis is on practical applications. Prerequisites: basic ANOVA and linear regression.
3 units, Spr (K. Sainani)

HRP 263. Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health
(Same as MED 263) Advanced methods currently used in published model-based cost-effectiveness analyses in medicine and public health, both theory and technical applications. Topics include: Markov and microsimulation models, model calibration and evaluation, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Prerequisites: a course in probability, statistics or biostatistics and a course on cost-effectiveness such as HRP 392.
3 units, Spr (J. Goldhaber-Fieber)

HRP 280. Spanish for Medical Students
(Same as SPANLANG 121M). Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis on taking the medical history. Topics include the human body, hospital procedures, diagnostics, food, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge.
3 units, Aut (I. Corso)

HRP 281. Spanish for Medical Students
(Same as SPANLAN 122M). Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on performing a physical examination. Topics include the human body, hospital procedures, diagnostics, food, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge.
3 units, Win (I. Corso)

HRP 282. Spanish for Medical Students
(Same as SPANLAN 123M). Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on performing a physical examination. Topics include the human body, hospital procedures, diagnostics, food, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge.
3 units, Spr (I. Corso)

HRP 283. Health Services Core Seminar
Presentation of research in progress and tutorials in the field of health services research.
1 unit, Aut, Win, Spr (C. Haberland)

HRP 290. Advanced Medical Spanish Oral Communication
Enrollment limited to medical students. Designed to further develop linguistic skills, covering all medical specialties according to student needs. Sessions also include topics on patient education and diseases, such as diabetes, asthma, TB, and CVDs.
3 units, Aut, Win, Spr (I. Corso)

HRP 299. Directed Reading in Health Research and Policy
Epidemiology, health services research, preventive medicine, medical genetics, public health, economics of medical care, occupational or environmental medicine, international health, or related fields. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

HRP 351. Innovation and Management in Health Care
(Same as GSBGEN 351) Biomedical innovations are rapidly redefining health care, transforming terminal diseases such as cancer and AIDS into chronic conditions. But progress comes at a huge cost: health care expenses now account for almost 14% of the GDP in the US, and they are expected to grow rapidly in the future. Further, the vast array of treatments and diagnostics spurred by innovation redefine the challenges faced by managers in this space. Management must coordinate different health care functions and firms into the pursuit of a common goal of "healthcare value maximization". This course will provide a unified view of the health care system, focusing on the effect of innovation on value generation and patient care integration. Guest speakers will include some of the most respected executives, clinical key opinion leaders, and venture capitalists in life sciences/health care. The following topics will be explored through a combination of lectures, case discussions and guest speakers: - The multiple dimensions of value in health care - The health care value system - Integrated care delivery systems and managed care - Principles of managed care - Health care reimbursement systems and their effect on biomedical innovation - The innovators and their business strategies: medical devices, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, health care information systems - Financing innovation. This course provides a top-down view of the health care system and its effect on innovation, and it can be bundled with the Biodesign Innovation courses (OIT 384/385) for a bottom-up experience in health care innovation. While students taking this course will be able to appreciate the strategic challenges facing the different firms in the health care value system, students taking OIT 384/385 will gain hands-on experience on the early-stages towards the commercialization of biomedical discoveries. The Innovators part of the course will be co-taught with Rob Chess, chairman and ex-CEO of Nektar therapeutics.
4 units, Win (S. Zenios, R. Chess) Not offered 2009-10.

HRP 370. Medical Scholars Research
Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
4 to18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)

HRP 391. Health Care Regulation, Finance and Policy
( Same as LAW 348, PUBLPOL 231) Provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the U.S. Potential topics include: health reform, health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), medical malpractice and quality regulation, pharmaceuticals, the corporate practice of medicine, regulation of fraud and abuse, and international comparisons.
3 units, Win (D. Kessler)

HRP 392. Analysis of Costs, Risks, and Benefits of Health Care
(Same as BIOMEDIN 432, MGTECON 332). For graduate students. The principal evaluative techniques for health care, including utility assessment, cost-effectiveness analysis, cost-benefit analysis, and decision analysis. Emphasis is on the practical application of these techniques. Group project presented at end of quarter. Guest lectures by experts from the medical school, pharmaceutical industry, health care plans, and government.
4 units, Aut (A. Garber, D. Owens)

HRP 399. Graduate Research
Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
1 to 18 units, any quarter (Search for instructor in Axess)



 

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